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          SPECIALIZING IN ORIGINAL CIVIL WAR MEMORABILIA        
A "Pro-South" Lady in Greenwood, MD. Writes Two Letters: 1st DESCRIBES THE SOUTH'S INVASION OF MD. IN JUNE; 2nd THE NEW YORK DRAFT RIOTS - GREAT CONTENT!

We usually don’t get too excited about civilian letters... but these examples by a lady “Rebecca” who lived in Greenwood, Maryland and writes her Aunt in New York City are really great. 

The first letter dated June 23rd, 1863 is 5 ½ pages in length, written in ink.  It provides a wonderful picture of the South’s invasion:

  • “There are no cars now running to Hood’s Mill.  The Confederates have possession of Frederick and have burned one of the railroad bridges, consequently the cars advance no further than Ellicott’s Mills.” (Rebecca had ordered some window shades through her Aunt in NYC but now there was no way for them to be shipped.)
  • “We are not entirely cut off from Baltimore though, we can take the stage at Brookville which conveys us to the Washington train of cars at Laurel Factory, thus we get our mail.” (Both letters come with original covers with postmark “Brookville, MD. One has a 3 cent postage stamp and one doesn’t.)
  • “The excitement in the city was intense, streets barricaded with hogsheads of tobacco, flour barrels, etc. anticipating a cavalry raid.”
  • “Have not the Confeds behaved like true Southerners in Pennsylvania.  The contrast is so marked between their conduct & that of the Federals on Virginia soil.”
  • “Gen. Lee is near Leesburg threatening Hooker and tis said, determined to take Washington.”
  • “On Sunday there was an incessant roar of cannon in that direction from morning till eleven o’clock p.m.  There must have been a severe battle though the papers yesterday spoke of it as mere artillery skirmishing, a true sign the Federals gained no advantage.”
  • “As we sat upon the portico listening to the dreaded sound, I sadly thought of the many poor fellows lying in agony and none to relieve them & with what sang-froid we were discussing the results. “
  • “We anticipate with forebodings of trouble the appearance of either army here.  Would certainly prefer having our Confeds but I trust we may remain in peace.  Far from exciting rumor, the country so calm and beautiful we do not at all realize our danger.”
  • “I am hoping for the best and do not really feel alarmed.  With Vicksburg too in status-quo I think the Feds have reason to be dismayed, they certainly are in this state.”

The second letter dated July 18th, 1863 is written by Rebecca, again to her Aunt who lives on West 45th Street in NYC.  On the front of the very nice envelope that the letter was sent in Rebecca’s Aunt has written “Received 21st July, 63” and “After the Riot”.   This letter is 4 pages in length written in ink.  Rebecca starts off, “Through the papers we have terrible accounts of the scenes enacted in your midst this week, which causes us much anxiety in your behalf.  Some of these horrors must have been perpetuated almost before your door, but we trust none of you have been in any way injured.  Ma desires me to say that while such excitement prevails in your city, you & your family had much better pay is a visit.”

She goes on to state, “Gen. Lee has returned to Virginia and all with us is again quiet.”

Concerning the Draft Riots:

  • “You must have had a very trying time, but I should think the presence of the returned troops would quell the insurgents.”
  • “I do not wonder many poor fellows object to the draft, but tis sad to read of the fiendish delight with which vengeance has been wreaked on many innocent.  Thus you may have some idea of what some of the Southern cities have suffered, through the lands of a lawless soldiery.”

NEXT COMES SOME GREAT CONTENT ON CONTRABAND BLACKS SERVING IN THE UNION ARMY:

  • “A wagon train, gathering up all the Confederates left in their raid through our country, broken down horses & mules, old wagons, harness, etc. passed us on Wednesday.  Halted a while before our gate, old contraband drivers, who in loud tones with terrible oaths expressed their detestation of their former mode of life to our servants, had no respect for the white officers with them & seemed to be on perfect equality.  How it made my blood boil!  The change of position of the armies will I suppose rid us again from such annoyance.”

TWO WONDERFUL LETTERS… WHERE HAVE YOU SEEN BETTER CONTENT?  PRICED FOR THE PAIR. 

#L540MD - Price for the pair $450















































TRANSCRIPTION LETTER ONE:












LETTER TWO:







































TRANSCRIPTION LETTER TWO: