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7th Ohio Volunteer Infantry Letter - Battle Action at Lookout Mountain
In this 4 page letter in ink, Oliver C. Trembly, writes home to his parents about the great Union victories being fought around Lookout Mountain.  The letter has many great lines and comes with its original cover.
  • “We are now encamped directly at the foot of Lookout mountain and within easy range of the enemy’s guns from which they have been firing occasionally ever since our arrival but as yet have failed to do us any damage, and I guess they begin to think that it hardly pays to waste their ammunition for they have slackend their fire considerable within the last two or three days.” 
  • “Gen. Hooker took them rather by surprise when he appeared here and has gained a very important point and a strong position.  Our advance hurt.  Some pretty sharp skirmishing the first night after they came in here.” 
  • “One Div. of Longstreet’s Corps came down off from the mountain and tried to surprise them, but they found our boys wide awake and ready for the onset.  The Rebs came up in their old style yelling don’t fire on your own men, but the ruse this time only proved fatal to them for our men reserved their fire until the Rebs came within short range when they opened on them such a terrific fire that it sent them back in the utmost confusion and with a very heavy loss.  The fight lasted two hours and the Rebs were beaten off at every point and fled to the mountain, leaving in front of the regts. of our div. that were engaged, 126 dead and a large number of arms.” 
  • “The 11th Corps about two miles farther up had a severe engagement with them at the same time and whipped them as handsomely as did the few regts of our Div.  Their loss must have been very heavy for it is calculated in battle that there are six men wounded to everyone killed.  The loss of our Div. was 200 killed and wounded.” 
  • “Longstreet’s Corps has been relieve on the mountains by Pemberton’s old Corps. commanded at present by Breckenridge.  They are very talkative and want to converse with our pickets all day long.  They are only separated from us by a narrow deep stream of water.  They ask us all kinds of questions about the north and what will be done with them if they give themselves up.  Of course we tell them the truth but make it appear as bright as possible and it is having a glorious affect on them for they are coming in to our lines in large squads both officers and men and give us valuable information.  There is not a soldier in this army but would divide his last hardtack with them and the lord knows we do not get to many of them for we have been on short rations since our arrival here.” 
  • “Rosecrans army had been on quarter rations for some time and there was a good prospect of their having to evacuate the place had it not been for the timely arrival of Gen. Hooker opening the river.  There is now two steam boats on the river bringing supplies up from Bridgeport.”
  • “Will has been helping fetch some siege guns up from Bridgeport.  They just brought up 16 heavy guns besides one battery that has been stationed here.  Gen. Grant is here superintending the planting of them in persons.  He intends making a noise here one of these fine mornings that will be rather to the Johnny Rebs discomfort.” 
  • “Now I am telling you the truth when I say that I would rather fight this army here than to fight half the same numbered of Lee’s Army in Va.  They are not half so determined and are so disaffected they will desert at every opportunity.  Another thing, the good name Lee’s army has acquired will make them always fight well if they have no other hopes.” 
  • “The place looks very desolate and I think it must be rather a poor specimen of the place it was in 60’s when Minor was running on this rail.  The large depot has been perfectly scuttled and a great deal of the place has been torn down by the soldiers.  I have heard that Flavel Jones was really killed in the late battle.  What a pity, he was a good boy and I do know he made a good soldier.  His people must take its very hard.”

Trembly enlisted on June 20th, 1861 as a Private and served his full 3 years.  Apparently, he reenlisted… or perhaps he was discharged?  In either case, poor Trembly died on 6/24/1864 on the Ohio River!  Letters from the 7th Ohio, a great unit, are especially desirable!

#L440 - Price $650

 

      Transcription:

                                                                                                                                             Lookout Valley
                                                                                              Six miles from Chattanooga Nov. 8th, 1863

                            Dear Parents,

                     We are now encamped directly at the foot of Lookout mountain
and within easy range of the enemy’s guns from which they have been firing
occasionally ever since our arrival but as yet have failed to do us any damage,
and I guess they begin to think that it hardly pays to waste their ammunition
for they have slackend their fire considerable within the last two or three
days.  Gen. Hooker took them rather by surprise when he appeared here and
has gained a very important point and a strong position.  Our advance hurt. 
Some pretty sharp skirmishing the first night after they came in here.  One
Div. of Longstreet’s Corps came down off from the mountain and tried to
surprise them, but they found our boys wide awake and ready for the onset. 
The Rebs came up in their old style yelling don’t fire on your own men, but
the ruse this time only proved fatal to them for our men reserved their fire
until the Rebs came within short range when they opened on them such a
terrific fire that it sent them back in the utmost confusion and with a very
heavy loss.  The fight lasted two hours and the Rebs were beaten off at every
point and fled to the mountain, leaving in front of the regts. of our div. that
were engaged, 126 dead and a large number of arms.  The 11th Corps about
two miles farther up had a severe engagement with them at the same time
and whipped them as handsomely as did the few regts of our Div.  Their loss
 must have been very heavy for it is calculated in battle that there are six
men wounded to everyone killed.  The loss of our Div. was 200 killed and
wounded.  Our brigade had not came up at the time so we were not engaged. 
Longstreet’s Corps has been relieve on the mountains by Pemberton’s old
Corps. commanded at present by Breckenridge.  They are very talkative and
 want to converse with our pickets all day long.  They are only separated from
 us by a narrow deep stream of water.  They ask us all kinds of questions about
the north and what will be done with them if they give themselves up.  Of
 course we tell them the truth but make it appear as bright as possible and it
 is having a glorious affect on them for they are coming in to our lines in large
squads both officers and men and give us valuable information.  There is not
a soldier in this army but would divide his last hardtack with them and the
lord knows we do not get to many of them for we have been on short rations
since our arrival here.  Rosecrans army had been on quarter rations for some
time and there was a good prospect of their having to evacuate the place had
 it not been for the timely arrival of Gen. Hooker opening the river.  There is
 now two steam boats on the river bringing supplies up from Bridgeport.  The
army in Chattanooga has been supplied and now we are beginning to get
plenty.  I saw Will last evening.  He came up to see me.  He looks tough and
hearty as I ever saw him.  He has been helping fetch some siege guns up from
 Bridgeport.  They just brought up 16 heavy guns besides one battery that has
 been stationed here.  Gen. Grant is here superintending the planting of them
 in persons.  He intends making a noise here one of these fine mornings that
will be rather to the Johnny Rebs discomfort.  Now I am telling you the truth
when I say that I would rather fight this army here than to fight half the same
 numbered of Lee’s Army in Va.  They are not half so determined and are so
disaffected they will desert at every opportunity.  Another thing, the good
 name Lee’s army has acquired will make them always fight well if they
have no other hopes.  I also like this country well but the weather I think is
unhealthy for the days are quite warm and the nights extremely cold.  I was
in Chattanooga a few days ago and saw the 60th O.V.I. but found but very few
 of the boys that I was acquainted with.  All the boys are well and seem in
good spirits since they begin to get full rations.  The place looks very desolate
 and I think it must be rather a poor specimen of the place it was in 60’s when
Minor was running on this rail.  The large depot has been perfectly scuttled
and a great deal of the place has been torn down by the soldiers.  I have heard
 that Flavel Jones was really killed in the late battle.  What a pity, he was a
good boy and I do know he made a good soldier.  His people must take its very
 hard.  I recd. a letter from Mother and Eva a short time since.  Will you take
this for an answer for both.  I must now close by sending my respected to all.  
Write soon. 
                               From your son, 
                                          Affectionately,
                                                           O. C. Trembley

                            Father I wish you would send me the Tribune regularly.  If you take it we
                            cannot get papers here very regular so we miss a great deal of the news.  You
                            may also send me a few stamps they are hard to get in this country.  My health
                            is good yet.