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          SPECIALIZING IN ORIGINAL CIVIL WAR MEMORABILIA        
Letter from Corp. Arthur M. Stone, 34th Mass. Infantry: Appomattox Court House, The Death of President Lincoln, “A piece of the apple tree under which General Lee surrendered his sword to General Grant” & “Some Confederate money which I got from some of the prisoners of Lee’s army. Some of them gave it away and some would sell it for a cent on a dollar” – RELICS INCLUDED!
Arthur M. Stone was an 18 year old bootmaker when he enlisted in July of 1862 into Company E of the 34th Mass. Infantry. He was a resident of Spencer, Mass. The letter is 4 pages written in pencil. It comes with a fine envelope addressed in ink. On the bottom of the 4th page there is a small piece of wood glued to the page. Enclosed in the letter are 2 Confederate notes, a $5 and a $10, both printed in 1864. Both notes are in good condition and are not faded. The letter is headed, “Head Quarters Indpe. Div. 24th A. C. On the road to Burkeville, Va. April 18th, 1865”. Arthur is writing his mother:

• “We have left Appomattox C. H. and are on the road to Farmville, and from thence we go to Burkeville. We are traveling over the same ground we came over before, though we are not making so long marches as we did then.”

• “We have encamped for the night about 3 miles beyond Farmville towards Burkeville and about 13 miles march will bring us to Burkeville tomorrow, and then it remains to be seen where we shall go from there.”

• “And if we are going to Petersburg or Richmond, whether we have got to march it, or whether we shall get a chance ride in the cars. The latter I sincerely hope for my feet are getting a little sore AND MY OLD BOOTS ARE FAST WEARING OUT.”

• “WE HEARD A VERY SAD STORY YESTERDAY WHICH WAS THAT PRESIDENT LINCOLN HAD BEEN ASSASSINATED AND KILLED AT FORD'S THEATER IN WASHINGTON.”

• “Also Secretary Seward and his son, if such proves to be true, and I fear it is, so it is a very sad thing to loose so good a man as President Lincoln was.” • “IT SEEMS VERY SAD TO THINK HE COULD NOT LIVE TO SEE THE END (WHICH I THINK IS FAST APPROACHING) OF THIS REBELLION, BUT SO GOD HAS WILLED IT, I SUPPOSE.”

• “Tell Wm. Commins or his wife I saw Wm's brother (I have forgotten his first name) today in Farmville in the 36th Mass. Their Brigade of the 9th Corps is doing duty in Farmville. He is looking well. I have seen him before in Spencer and knew him and he knew me. I cannot tell you how bad or where the men were wounded in our company, except Hawes who was severely wounded in the side near the lungs and Richard Young in the arm, I believe.”

• “We have already received orders to march in the morning at 5 o'clock, and as it is now nearly ten o'clock, I will close for tonight. Good Night. Arthur”

• “Walking on the South side railroad. Wednesday morning, April 19th, 1865. We have commenced our march again this morning towards Burkeville, and I am writing this under an old pine tree, beside of the South side railroad. I walked on the railroad because I can save a great deal in the distance than if I walked in the road.”

• “ENCLOSED YOU WILL FIND A PIECE OF THE APPLE TREE UNDER WHICH GEN. LEE SURRENDERED HIS SWORD TO GEN. GRANT.”

• “I meant to have sent it before but have forgotten it. ALSO SOME CONFEDERATE MONEY WHICH I GOT FROM SOME OF THE PRISONERS OF LEE'S ARMY. SOME OF THEM GAVE IT AWAY, AND SOME WOULD SELL IT FOR A CENT ON A DOLLAR. SO YOU SEE THEY KNOW T IS NOT GOOD FOR MUCH.”

• “But I must march on. My love to Harry. Ever Your Loving Son, Arthur”


The best way to display this letter with its “souvenirs” is to have the letter open to page 4 as that is where Arthur talks about his enclosures. Framed up along with the transcription you have a great picture of the end of this great Civil War: the surrender, the death of Lincoln, and the now worthless Confederate money!

#L741 - Price $850




Full Transcription:

Head Quarters Indpe. Div. 24th A. C. 
On the road to Burkeville, Va. April 18th, 1865 

My Dear Mother,
I will commence another letter to you and shall send it the first opportunity, though what I have written lately you may get all in a bunch, for all I know. We have left Appomattox C. H. and are on the road to Farmville, and from thence we go to Burkeville. We are traveling over the same ground we came over before, though we are not making so long marches as we did then. We have encamped for the night about 3 miles beyond Farmville towards Burkeville and about 13 miles march will bring us to Burkeville tomorrow, and then it remains to be seen where we shall go from there. And if we are going to Petersburg or Richmond, whether we have got to march it, or whether we shall get a chance ride in the cars. The latter I sincerely hope for my feet are getting a little sore and my old boots are fast wearing out. We heard a very sad story yesterday which was that President Lincoln had been assassinated and killed at Ford's Theater in Washington. Also Secretary Seward and his son, if such proves to be true, and I fear it is, so it is a very sad thing to loose so good a man as President Lincoln was. It seems very sad to think he could not live to see the end (which I think is fast approaching) of this rebellion, but so God has willed it, I suppose. Tell Wm Commins or his wife I saw Wm's brother (I have forgotten his first name) today in Farmville in the 36th Mass. Their Brigade of the 9th Corps is doing duty in Farmville. He is looking well. I have seen him before in Spencer and knew him and he knew me. I cannot tell you how bad or where the men were wounded in our company, except Hawes who was severely wounded in the side near the lungs and Richard Young in the arm, I believe. We have already received orders to march in the morning at 5 o'clock, and as it is now nearly ten o'clock, I will close for tonight. Good Night. Arthur

Walking on the South side railroad. Wednesday morning, April 19th, 1865

We have commenced our march again this morning towards Burkeville, and I am writing this under an old pine tree, beside of the South side railroad. I walked on the railroad because I can save a great deal in the distance than if I walked in the road. Enclosed you will find a piece of the Apple tree under which Gen. Lee surrendered his sword to Gen. Grant. I meant to have sent it before but have forgotten it. Also some Confederate money which I got from some of the prisoners of Lee's Army. Some of them gave it away, and some would sell it for a cent on a dollar. So you see they know it is not good for much. But I must march on. My love to Harry.

Ever Your Loving Son,
Arthur



















































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